He Chose

[28] After this, Jesus, knowing that all was now finished, said (to fulfill the Scripture), “I thirst.” [29] A jar full of sour wine stood there, so they put a sponge full of the sour wine on a hyssop branch and held it to his mouth. [30] When Jesus had received the sour wine, he said, “It is finished,” and he bowed his head and gave up his spirit. 

– John 19:28-30

Some things are not our choice.  They just happen to us.  I was born in southern California.  I am a boy.  I am short.  I did not choose these things.

The cross is not a tragedy that happened to Jesus.  It did not surprise Him.  It was not something unfortunate, outside of His control.

On Good Friday, the crowd was not in control.  The Pharisees and scribes were not in control. Pilate was not in control.  Not even Satan himself was in control.  Jesus and Jesus alone was in control.

What does this mean?  It means you are loved.

Things that just happen to us don’t say much about what we value or what’s in our hearts.  My core value is not manhood or shortness.  It’s the things we choose that reveal what we really love.  What we choose to do with our time, money, vacation days, etc. reveal what we love.

Jesus chose all that happened to Him.  He did not have to die on a cross.  Some may say He had to because He’s God and God is supposed to do that, but it’s not true.  He had the power and right to do otherwise.  He would have been equally just, righteous, and good if He left us in our sin.

But He chose.  He chose to be flogged, mocked, rejected, and crucified.  He chose to become sin and bear the wrath of God in our place because He loves us.

The cross tells us that sin deserves death.  It tells us our Lord suffered terrible.  And it tells us that we are loved by the God of all creation.  Jesus proved it by choosing the cross.

No Place for Sacrifice

No Place for Truth
David Wells

Interpersonal relationships inevitable involve conflicts of interest that can be resolved only by compromise and sacrifice.  Self-fulfillers place a premium on such relationships, and yet their guiding concern for self-fulfillment, their devotion to self-interest, would seem almost to guarantee that they will not be successful in maintaining them.

Knowing God

[3] And this is eternal life, that they know you, the only true God, and Jesus Christ whom you have sent.

– John 17:3

My children love it when their grandparents visit. Grandma and Grandpa give them gifts, take them places, and play with them. When they leave, my kids are sad. They still have the toys, but they miss their grandparents.

For children of God, faith is about more than the toys. Being a child of God is more than knowing the right things or even doing the right things. It’s about knowing the one true and living God, to love to be with the Father, and to love to worship Jesus Christ His Son.

A Powerful Love

[9] In this the love of God was made manifest among us, that God sent his only Son into the world, so that we might live through him. [10] In this is love, not that we have loved God but that he loved us and sent his Son to be the propitiation for our sins.

– 1 John 4:9-10

God sent His only Son to die on our behalf. He has shown us a costly love. In verse 10, we find the word ‘propitiation.’ It is an odd word and it means that Jesus has paid for our sins and made us right with God. So God has shown us not only a costly love, but a powerful love.

If you fell into the Ohio river and I jumped in to save you, it would be a costly love. But it makes a difference whether I actually do save you or whether you still drown. Jesus died on the cross and He did not die trying to save us. No on the cross He conquers sin and death and He actually saves sinners from hell.

Love Alone

Caedmon’s Call

The prince of despair’s been beaten
But the loser still fights
Death’s on a long leash
Stealing my friends to the night

And everyone cries for the innocent
You say to love the guilty, too
And I’m surrounded by suffering and sickness
So I’m working tearing back the roof

A Change of Mind

Divine Double-Talk and the Parable of the Good Samaritan
William M. Cwirla

[25] And behold, a lawyer stood up to put him to the test, saying, “Teacher, what shall I do to inherit eternal life?” [26] He said to him, “What is written in the Law? How do you read it?” [27] And he answered, “You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your strength and with all your mind, and your neighbor as yourself.” [28] And he said to him, “You have answered correctly; do this, and you will live.”

[29] But he, desiring to justify himself, said to Jesus, “And who is my neighbor?” [30] Jesus replied, “A man was going down from Jerusalem to Jericho, and he fell among robbers, who stripped him and beat him and departed, leaving him half dead. [31] Now by chance a priest was going down that road, and when he saw him he passed by on the other side. [32] So likewise a Levite, when he came to the place and saw him, passed by on the other side. [33] But a Samaritan, as he journeyed, came to where he was, and when he saw him, he had compassion. [34] He went to him and bound up his wounds, pouring on oil and wine. Then he set him on his own animal and brought him to an inn and took care of him.

– Luke 10:25-34

Who is most like Christ in the parable? The broken man in the ditch. He is Christ in cognito, hidden under weakness, beaten, broken, and bloody, who himself is on the road to Jerusalem to fall among the religious and be crucified with the thieves. And the only way to relate to him is to repent of the religious notion that commandment-keeping is the way to inherit eternal life, drop dead to the law, get off your religious high horse, and take your place in the ditch along with the Samaritan and the man who fell among the thieves.

Only one who is completely free of the law can even remotely do the law. The law says, “Love God and love your neighbor,” including that poor loser lying there in the ditch bleeding to death. But if your eternal life hangs on your bending down to help him, you are doomed from the start because you will not only resent him for lying there in the ditch, you’ll despise God for commanding you to help him.

Jesus’ parable turns out to be a poison pill for what Paul calls the righteous which is by the law. In order to concur with the law, the lawyer must criticize the priest and Levite and identify with the Samaritan, the very person he least admires. What must one “do” to inherit eternal life? In a word: Repent. Have a change of mind, a re-thinking, a “re-cognition.” “Re-cognize” who God is and who you are. You are a sinner under the law, and the law can’t help you. Your only hope is the broken man on the cross. He alone holds your life in a way that you cannot.

Link: Complete Article

Dead to the Law

Divine Double-Talk and the Parable of the Good Samaritan
William M. Cwirla

[30] Jesus replied, “A man was going down from Jerusalem to Jericho, and he fell among robbers, who stripped him and beat him and departed, leaving him half dead. [31] Now by chance a priest was going down that road, and when he saw him he passed by on the other side. [32] So likewise a Levite, when he came to the place and saw him, passed by on the other side. [33] But a Samaritan, as he journeyed, came to where he was, and when he saw him, he had compassion. [34] He went to him and bound up his wounds, pouring on oil and wine. Then he set him on his own animal and brought him to an inn and took care of him.

– Luke 10:30-34

Who fails to help the man in the ditch? The religious clergy-the priest and the Levite, whom the synagogue lawyer would hold up as examples of blue-ribbon righteousness. Why didn’t they help the man in the ditch? Not because they were wicked, or indifferent, or bad, or uncaring, but because their religion based on keeping the law would not permit them. If the man in the ditch were as dead as he appeared, the priest and Levite would have become ceremonially unclean simply by touching him (Lev. 19:11-13). Rabbinic interpretation drew a four-cubit radius safety zone around the corpse. Step inside and you’re automatically unclean. Even if the priest and Levite were heading home for the holidays, the last thing they would want is to come home in a state of impurity. In addition to the humiliation, there would be the time-consuming and costly process of restoration. Most people would have approved the priest’s and Levite’s decision not to help the man in the ditch.

Priest and Levite are caught between a legal rock and a rabbinic hard place. The law says they must love their neighbor. Yet helping the man in the ditch puts them at risk of ritual impurity. And all the while they must also love God who makes these laws in the first place. Only the Samaritan, a half-breed heretical layman, is free enough to stoop down and help the man in the ditch.

He’s dead to the law, impure from the start. Ritual purity is the least of his concerns. He needs no commandment; he seeks no reward. He is free to help the man in the ditch for no other reason than the man needs help, and his help far exceeds what the law required precisely because he acts in freedom.

Link: Complete Article

What is love?

Luke 6:32-36

[32] “If you love those who love you, what benefit is that to you? For even sinners love those who love them. [33] And if you do good to those who do good to you, what benefit is that to you? For even sinners do the same. [34] And if you lend to those from whom you expect to receive, what credit is that to you? Even sinners lend to sinners, to get back the same amount. [35] But love your enemies, and do good, and lend, expecting nothing in return, and your reward will be great, and you will be sons of the Most High, for he is kind to the ungrateful and the evil. [36] Be merciful, even as your Father is merciful.

In popular culture, the pinnacle of love is seen in romance (think Titanic), family (think Frozen), or friendship (think The Sandlot). Jesus does describe His love for the church as the love between a bridegroom for his bride. When it comes to love, He also invokes the metaphors of family and friendship. But Jesus does not point to these pictures when He describes the greatest possible love. Rather, the greatest possible love is love for the ungrateful and the evil. It is not pretty (crucifixion was brutal). It is not romantic (sinners cause no one to swoon). It is not logical (enemies are to be hated, not loved). But there is no love in this world that is like this. There is no love that can compare.